Deep South Needs Prevention Resources to Address High Prevalence of Undiagnosed HIV in the Region

According to the recently released CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR), Prevalence of Diagnosed and Undiagnosed HIV Infection – United States, 2008-2012persons who are unaware of their HIV+ status contribute to nearly one third of ongoing HIV transmission in the United States.[1]  “[The] data demonstrate[s] the need for interventions and public health strategies to reduce the prevalence of undiagnosed HIV infection.” The CDC reports that only 5 jurisdictions met the National HIV/AIDS Strategy objective of increasing the percentage of persons living with HIV who know their serostatus to ≥90% (Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, and New York).  Only two jurisdictions met this goal for the important target population of MSM.

The data presented by the CDC underscores the need for effective prevention interventions and strategies to reduce the prevalence of undiagnosed HIV infection in the 9 Deep South states targeted by the Southern HIV/AIDS Strategy Initiative (AL, FL, GA, LA, MS, NC, SC, TN, TX). All 9 Deep South states are in the top 25 jurisdictions with the highest rates of persons living with diagnosed and undiagnosed HIV in 2012.  These same Deep South states are also in the top 25 jurisdictions with the highest numbers of persons living with undiagnosed HIV.[2] Focusing on the priority population of men who have sex with men (MSM), all of the Deep South states are also in the top 25 jurisdictions with the highest numbers of MSM with undiagnosed HIV and 8 of the Deep South states are in the top 25 jurisdictions with the highest percentages of MSM living with undiagnosed HIV.[3]

Many of the Deep South states have HIV epidemics that are dispersed outside of the large urban areas currently eligible for direct CBO (Community Based Organization) funding from the CDC.  See SASI’s report, ONE SIZE DOES NOT FIT ALL: What Does High Impact Prevention Funding Mean for Community-Based Organizations in the Deep South? In light of the recently released data from the CDC, we continue to call on the CDC to provide prevention funding that addresses the HIV epidemic in states with more dispersed epidemics, high diagnosis rates, high prevalence of undiagnosed HIV, and high death rates.

Persons aged 13 years living with diagnosed or undiagnosed HIV infection—US, 2012*

(Ranked by Rate per 100,000 population)

*Data from MMWR, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, June 26, 2015/Vo. 64/ No. 24, Table 1

Persons aged 13 years living with undiagnosed HIV infection—US, 2012*

(Ranked by number of persons living with undiagnosed HIV infection)

* Data from MMWR, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, June 26, 2015/Vo. 64/ No. 24, Table 1

Males 13 years with undiagnosed HIV infection attributed to male-to-male sexual contact—US, 2012 *

(Ranked by number of MSM living with undiagnosed HIV infection)

* Data from MMWR, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, June 26, 2015/Vo. 64/ No. 24, Table 2

Males 13 years with undiagnosed HIV infection attributed to male-to-male sexual contact—US, 2012 *

(Ranked by percentage of MSM living with undiagnosed HIV infection)

* Data from MMWR, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, June 26, 2015/Vo. 64/ No. 24, Table 2

_______________________________________________________

[1] MMWR, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, June 26, 2015/Vo. 64/ No. 24

[2] MMWR, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, June 26, 2015/Vo. 64/ No. 24, Table 1

[3] MMWR, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, June 26, 2015/Vo. 64/ No. 24, Table 2

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