Disproportionate Impact of HIV in the South has been Consistent from 2008 – 2011

4/23/2014: SASI Trends Report expanded: HIV/AIDS in the Southern US: Trends from 2008-2011 Show a Consistent Disproportionate Epidemic. The SASI research team has expanded its analysis of the CDC HIV surveillance data over a four year period (2008-2011) and today released their updated report.  SASI’s analysis shows that black/African-American MSM and women remain the hardest hit in the deep south southern region.  The percentage increase of new HIV and AIDS diagnoses that were black/African American MSM was the largest in the South.  In the targeted deep south region, the percentage of new HIV diagnoses among black/African American MSM increased from 26% in 2008 to 29.9% in 2011.

For black/African-American women, the large disparity in rates with those of white women remain in the targeted deep south region.  In 2011 the HIV diagnosis rate for black/African-American women in the targeted region was 42.8/100,000 white the rate for white women was 3.2/100,000.                                                                        

Figure 4–Percent of HIV Diagnoses that are black-African American MSM

3/11/14:  New SASI ReportHIV/AIDS in the Southern US: Trends from 2008-2011 Show a Consistent Dispropotionate Epidemic.  The SASI research team analysis of CDC HIV surveillance data over a four year period (2008-2011) shows that the deep south region (AL, FL, GA, LA, MS, NC, SC, TN, TX) has had the highest HIV and AIDS diagnosis rates as well as the highest HIV and AIDS case fatality rates for each year during this time period. These states also had the highest number of people living with HIV of any region in 2011. In 2011, 40% of new HIV diagnoses were in the targeted deep south states, a region that contains only 28% of the US population.

Figure 1: Regional HIV Diagnosis Rates 2008-2011

Figure 4- Regional AIDS Diagnosis Rates 2008-2011

Figure 1A-Number of HIV Diagnoses by Region and Year

Figure 2A-Number of AIDS Diagnoses by Region and Year

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